Year
Event
1600
Creation of the English East India Company in London on 31 Dec 1600 following the voyage of Ralph Fitch.

[Ref: The Siamese memoirs of Count Claude de Forbin 1685-1688 - Michael Smithies (1996)]
1601
The brother of the Khmer King, who was captured in the Siam-Cambodian war of 1593-4,  is sent back to Cambodia under conditions.

[Ref: Van Vliet, Jeremias. The Short History of the Kings of Siam. Bangkok: The Siam Society, 1975 (Translated by David Wyatt); Vickery - Review of
The Short History of the Kings of Siam - JSS 64 2]
1601
Jacob Corneliszoon van Neck arrived with the ships Amsterdam and Gouda as first Dutchman in Patani to buy pepper and other merchandise.

[Valentyn Francois - Oud en Nieuw Oost Indien (1626) - Deel 3 - Boek 6 - Beschryvinge van Siam en onsen Handel aldaar. - page 90]
1602
Creation of the Dutch Verenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie (VOC).

[Ref: The Siamese memoirs of Count Claude de Forbin 1685-1688 - Michael Smithies (1996)]
1602
Dec
Another two ships from the Old East-India Company arrived in Patani. An Amsterdam trading post and a Zeeland trading post were established in location
in December 1602, the year the Dutch East India Company received its first charter.

[Ref: English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John Anderson (1890) - Page 44]
1603
Ayutthaya intervenes in Cambodia during a local conflict among Cambodian princes in which the Siamese aided the one whom they had restored to the
throne (the Chronicle of Lovek put this in 1605).  

[Ref: Vickery - Review of The Short History of the Kings of Siam - JSS 64 2]
1604
Shogun Ieyasu of the Tukugawa Shogunate granted three licences to Japanese traders residing in Siam to trade with Japan. This licence system remained
in force, probably until 1686, though the records do not go beyond 1615.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliets Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
1605
Death of King Naresuan (r. 1590-1605). Enthronement of King Ekathotsarot (r. 1605-1610/11), younger brother of Naresuan.

[Ref: Royal Chronicles of Ayutthaya]
  Reign of King Ekathotsarot (r. 1605-1610/11)
1605
The Dutch factory in Patani was burned by the Japanese. The Dutch remained and for many years they were the chief traders, carrying on a vigorous
commerce with Bantam.

[Ref: English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John Anderson (1890) - Page 44]
1606
Oct
Shogun Ieyasu of the Tukugawa Shogunate dispatched a letter dated 22 October 1606 to King Ekathotsarot. In this letter the Shogun asked for scented
wood and cannon and sent as presents to the king three suits of armour and ten long Japanese swords.  The Japanese port authorities were authorised a
month later to permit Siamese ships to trade with Japan, but it would appear that advantage of this permission was only taken in 1612.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliets Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
1607
Siamese Embassy to the Portuguese Viceroy at Goa to lodge a complaint against some Portuguese resident in Pegu. The Embassy set sail from
Tenasserim.

[Ref: English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John Anderson (1890) - Page 38]
1607
A Dutch VOC trading post was established in Songkhla (Sangora).
1607
9 Dec
Departure of a Siamese embassy to Holland. The embassy consisting of 16 men arrived arrived on 9 December 1607 on the Mauritius at the VOC post in
Bantam and were received reluctantly by Admiral Cornelis Matelieff de Jonge.

[Ref: English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John Anderson (1890) - Page 38]
1607
The first Portuguese Jesuit arrives in Ayutthaya.

[Ref: Smithies, Michael - Desfarges (General), De La Touche (Lieutenant.), Jean Vollant - Des Verquains - Three Military Accounts of the 1688
'Revolution' in Siam (Orchid Press, 2002)]
1608
28 Jan
The Siamese took off from Bantam to Holland on 28 January 1608 with Admiral Matelieff on board of his ship the Oranje. The Oranje arrived in Holland
on 2 September 1608.  

[Ref: English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John Anderson (1890) - Page 38]
1608
The Dutch Verenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie (VOC) opens a factory in Ayutthaya.

[Ref: The Siamese memoirs of Count Claude de Forbin 1685-1688 - Michael Smithies (1996)]
1608
The third Khlong Lat (short cut) on the Chao Phraya River was dug in 1608. Khlong Lat Kret Yai, was dug above Pathumthani to shrink 18 kilometers to
7.

[Reference: The Chao Phya, River in Transition - Steve Van Beeck (1995) - page 39.]
1608
2 Sep
The ship Oranje with Admiral Matelieff and the Siamese embassy arrived in Holland on 2 September 1608. The Siamese embassy was received on 11
September 1608 in audience at Den Haag by the Prince of Oranje, Maurice of Nassau and presented a number of valuable gifts.

[Ref: English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John Anderson (1890) - Page 38]
1608
Nov
Shogun Ieyasu of the Tukugawa Shogunate dispatched a second letter, dated 17th November asking for heavy cannon and gunpowder, which the Shogun
appraised having wonderful qualities. Six suits of armour were sent as present.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliets Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
1610
Oct
Shogun Ieyasu of the Tukugawa Shogunate dispatched a letter, dated 7 October 1610, tanking for his kind messages and for his promise to send heavy
cannon and gunpowder in the next year by a trading vessel. The Shogun sent fifty pistols for the King and fiftty pistols for the Foreign Minister, Okya
Phra Khlang, as well as one suit of armour, one sword and one double-edged dagger. The Japanese Foreign Minister wrote to Okya Phra Khlang, thanking
him for the promise to send heavy cannon, and also expressing a, hope that Siamese traders would visit Japan.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliets Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
1610/11
King Si Saowaphak is executed by his half-brother Prince Si Sin at Wat Khok Phraya in Ayutthaya. Enthronement of Prince Si Sin as King Songtham also
known as King Intharacha (reign 1610/1611-1628). [Ref: Royal Chronicles of Ayutthaya]
  Reign of King Songtham (1610/11-1628)
1612
The English Ship "Globe" arrives at Patani on 23 June 1612. The Queen of Patani receives the factors with a good reception. The factors deliver a present
and a letter from King James I, laid on a gold basin. Though much difficulty was experienced in obtaining the authorization to build a warehouse, the
English East-Indian Company (EIC) finally the received a  piece of ground sixty yards long and forty broad to construct a go-down..

[Ref: English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John Anderson (1890) - Page 48]
1612
Jul
An English "goudon" with five factors being Merchants Adam Denton, Essington, Lucas Antheuniss, Thomas Samuel and  Thomas Driver arrived at
Ayutthaya.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b/ Letter from Cornelis van Muyenrode to Hendrik Janssen at Patani
dated 2 Sep 1612; English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John Anderson (1890)]
1612
15 Aug
The English ship Globe departed on the 1st August from Patani and arrived in the Road of Siam on the 15th August 1612, bearing the letters from King
James I of England to the King of Siam.

[English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John Anderson (1890)]
1612
17 Sep
The English factors are received in audience by King Songtham (reign 1610/11-1628 AD) on 17th September. The factors received a little golden cup and
a small piece of clothing, permission to trade in his kingdom and were assigned a house close to the Dutch factory.

[English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John Anderson (1890) - page 50]
1612
28 Sep
The English factors received the key of their godown, a stone house, three stories high, and started its repair.

[English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John Anderson (1890) - page 49]
1613
In 1613 the Governor of Tavoy (Siam) made an attack on Re (Ye), a town north of Tavoy. The prince, one of the brothers of the King of Ava (Burma)
was captured and brought to Ayutthaya. The King of Ava immediately attacked and subjected Tavoy. He continued further to Tenasserim, in an attack by
land and sea, but encountered strong resistance of the Siamese aided by four galliots (small galleys) manned by 40 Portuguese and seventy slaves
commanded by Christopher Eebello, an outlaw from Cochin. The King of Ava was driven off with considerable losses in January 1614 and Tavoy was
retaken.

[Ref: 1. A History of Siam - W.A.R. Wood (1924) - Chalermnit Press - Page 164.  Ref 2. English Intercourse with Siam in the 17th century - John
Anderson (1890) - Page 39.]
1614
Siam and Ava are at war. All communication with Chiang Mai and Lan Chang was blocked by hostilities and trade ceased.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b/Letter of Mr. John Gourney dated 28 July 1614 to the English East
India Company.]
1616
King Songtham (r.1610/1611-1628) sent a diplomatic mission to the Tokugawa Shogunate in Japan in 1616. The mission was well received by the second
shogun Tokugawa Hidetada

[Reference: Southeast Asian History Seminar: Ayudhya and the Japanese – Nithi Iawsriwong (1999); Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliets Account
of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b; Gunji - The correspondence between Tokugawa Shogunate and Siamese Jing at the beginning of the Tokugawa period.]
1616
Creation of the Danish East Indian Company with dealings in Siam.

[Ref: The Siamese memoirs of Count Claude de Forbin 1685-1688 - Michael Smithies (1996)]
1617
A peace treaty was signed end 1617 between Siam and Ava under which Chiang Mai and many other places (such as Martaban) were ceded to Siam.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b/Letter of Mr. William Wilson dated 23 February 1618 at Jakatra to
Mr. Edward Long at Bantam.]
1617
A Dutch-Siamese treaty was concluded between Holland and Siam in 1617.
1617
The King of Siam send an embassy to the Viceroy in Goa. Siam offered Martaban to the Portuguese. The Portuguese king suggested a policy of
dissimulation and prudence in this matter as Martaban did not belong to Siam. Martaban was not in Siamese territory but in Mon country which the
Siamese kept under their rule, but at the present moment the Siamese were unable to govern it as formerly.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b; Letter from the King of Portugal to his Viceroy in Goa dated 17
January 1618; Rajanubhab, Damrong (Prince)  - Our Wars with the Burmese (1917) - White Lotus, Bangkok (2000) - page 97]
1618
The King of Siam send an embassy to the Viceroy in Goa and requested the Viceroy to send the embassy to Portugal in connection with the negotiations
regarding Martaban and other matters. The embassy did not got beyond Goa owing to sickness amongst its members. The Siamese ambassadors told the
Portuguese viceroy that if the Portuguese would send a boat force and patrol the seaboard of the western sea to prevent the Burmese from attacking
Tavoy and Tenasserim, the Siamese would consent to the Portuguese building forts in Martaban (in place of Siriam which the Burmese had captured and
taken away from the Portuguese - Martaban was now of importance to tho Portuguese on account of the Dutch military threat against Malacca, which
place they wrested from the Portuguese in 1641.)

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b; Letter from Viceroy in Goa to the King of Portugal dated 8
February 1619; Rajanubhab, Damrong (Prince)  - Our Wars with the Burmese (1917) - White Lotus, Bangkok (2000) - page 96]
1618
The Portuguese viceroy at Goa sent Frei Francisco da Annunciacao of the Order of the Preachers, to Ayutthaya together with the Siamese ambassadors
to consult about the terms of agreement to be made. Songtham (r. 1610/1611-1628) agreed on two clauses but refused the 3th clause by which the
Portuguese desired to expel all the Dutch from the territories of Siam. Not obtaining what he wanted, the priest Francisco returned to Goa.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b; Letter from Viceroy in Goa to the King of Portugal dated 8
February 1619; Rajanubhab, Damrong (Prince)  - Our Wars with the Burmese (1917) - White Lotus, Bangkok (2000) - page 96]
1621
1621 - Siamese embassy of Khun Phichit Sombat and Khun Prasert to Minomoto Hidetada, Shogun of Japan. The Siamese ambassadors arrived at Yedo
on 11 Oct 1621 and were lodged in a temple at Sia Kwan Chi. The embassy was composed of some sixty to seventy persons. The envoys were received
in audience by the Shogun on 13 Oct 1621 at which ceremony the royal rescript and a list of the gifts were presented. A second audience was given on
15 Oct when the royal gifts were presented. A farewell audience was given on 17 Oct. Presents to the Shogun were one long sword, one short sword,
two fowling muskets, ten rolls of foreign cloth, one gold salver, one ink grinding stone, and ten piculs of ivory. The Council of Ministers sent for the King
one horse, and for Okya Phra Khlang one Japanese sword. The presents for the King from the Shogun were three Japanese screens made of gold paper,
and three horses (which were requested by the Siamese king) fully equipped with saddles and bridles.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b; Southeast Asian History Seminar: Ayudhya and the Japanese -
Nithi Iawsriwong (1999)]
1622
King Sri Suphanarat of Cambodia, placed on the throne by Siam as a vassal, died. Prince Chetha, his son, revoked the vassalship of Siam and did not offer
the customary tribute. Ayutthaya prepared an army by land and water to Cambodia. In a letter of the Okya Phra Khlang to the Japanese Foreign Minister
Sakai Tadayo around March 1626, the Siamese official wrote that the rebellion in Cambodia still continued and that reinforcements were sent in to quell
the revolt. The speech of the King of Siam at his appointment written by Okaya Phra Klang (1622) of which a copy of this speech was given to Richard
Fursland, the representative of the English East India Company at Jacatra, mentions the defeat of the Siamese by the Cambodians during the monsoon
period. The Siamese navy was forced to return, while the land army was slain and the remaining troops imprisoned.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
1622
Trade was at a low ebb in the reign of King Song Tham because the monarch neglected to strengthen the military position of his country. The Dutch
closed their factory in Ayutthaya in 1622, because trade was not profitable; apparently a VOC representative remained (Joost Schouten) in order to keep
buying merchandise after the Dutch ships left. Trade relations continued and diplomatic courtesies were exchanged. The Dutch factory was reopened in
1624.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b; Een brief aan Jan Pietersz. Coen teruggevonden - W. Coolhaas -
Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde 112 (1956), no: 4, Leiden, 403-415]
1622
Closure of  the English East-Indian Company (EIC) in Ayutthaya.

[Ref: The Siamese memoirs of Count Claude de Forbin 1685-1688 - Michael Smithies (1996)]
1623
Siamese embassy of Luang Thong Samut and Khun Swat to Minomoto Hidetada, Shogun of Japan. Presents of the King of Siam to the Shogun were: A
hat made of fine woven bark; four catties weight of scented wood; two catties weight of camphor; one roll of five coloured striped gold cloth; one roll of
five coloured striped silver cloth; one roll of five coloured striped yellow cloth; one roll of three coloured striped silver cloth; ten rolls of white netting; ten
rolls of foreign cloth; two fowling pieces with gold damascened barrels; ten catties weight of white feathers. The shogun returned presents as followed:
two throwing lances; thirty coats; two horses with saddles and bridles.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b; Southeast Asian History Seminar: Ayudhya and the Japanese -
Nithi Iawsriwong (1999)]
1623
Richard Fursland, the representative of the English East India Company received an embassy of the King of Siam at Jacatra, Batavia. In the letter to the
King of Siam dated 27 February 1623 he warned the king that he was about to close down the English trading depot in Ayutthaya as it was run at loss.
For this purpose he sent the Siamese ambassadors back in a ship and requested the leave of his traders.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
1624
The Dutch trading post in Ayutthaya was re-opened again because Batavia was fearful that the Dutch position in Siam would be lost.
1624
Dec
The English closed their factory or depot in Ayutthaya in 1624. The factor Edward Long left Ayutthaya in December 1624 on board the Robuck, and died
on the voyage to Batavia.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
1626
Siamese embassy to the Shoguns of Japan being Hidetada and Iemitsu. Khun Raksa Sithiphol was the ambassador and acting Wat Nong At, was the
interpreter. The Dutch Ambassador Coenraed Krammer was in Yedo on 28 Oct 1626 and confirmed the presence of a Siamese Embassy waiting to be
received in audience by the Shoguns as their reception was postponed till the State visit by the Emperor was over.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b; A True Description of the Mighty Kingdoms off Japan and Siam -
Francis Caron and Joost Schouten (translated by Roger Manley), London 1671; Southeast Asian History Seminar: Ayudhya and the Japanese –
Nithi Iawsriwong (1999)]
1626
Arrival of the mission of Father Pedro de Morejon in Ayutthaya in 1626. The Spanish Jesuit received the task from the Governor of Manila to seek the
release of the Spanish prisoners caught in the Don Fernando De Silva incident of 1624 and to help start a Jesuit mission in Siam. With him were Fr.
Roman Nixi, a Japanese, and Antonio Cardim, a Portuguese priest with Laos as destination. Fr. Morejon left Manila in January 1626 and arrived in
Ayutthaya in March. His mission on behalf of the Spaniards was successful and he returned to Manila with the released prisoners.

[Reference: The Jesuits in Thailand - Part I 1607 - 1767 By Pietro Cerutti, S.J.]
1628
Dutch embassy (Joost Schouten) to the Court of Siam. Schouten continues from Siam to Japan in 1929.

[Ref: Villiers, John (1986) - François Caron and Joost Schouten - A True Description of the Mighty Kingdoms of Japan and Siam - facsimile of the 1671
London edition - The Siam Society, Bangkok.]
1628
Apr
Death of King Songtham (reign 1610/11-1628). Enthronement of King Chetthathirat (reign 1628 - 1629).

[Ref: Royal Chronicles of Ayutthaya; Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
1629
King Chetthathirat (reign 1628 - 1629) executed at Wat Khok Phraya in Ayutthaya. Enthronement of King Athityawong (reign 1629).

[Ref: Royal Chronicles of Ayutthaya]
1629
A Siamese embassy was send to Japan to inform the Shoguns of the accession of the new king, King Chetthathirat. The ambassadors were Luang Sakol
Decha, Khun Sawat and Khun Yothamat. The envoys travelled on a trading ship from Yamada somewhere end September/begin October 1628. Shogun
Hidetada received the ambassadors on his yacht the
Nishiromaru and also his son Shogun Iemitsu on board his yacht Comaru the 4th November 1629.
The farewell audience of the Shoguns was on 16 November 1629.

[Ref: Royal Chronicles of Ayutthaya; Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
1629
King Athityawong (reign 1629) executed at Wat Khok Phraya in Ayutthaya. Enthronement of the usurper King Prasat Thong (reign 1629-1656).

[Ref: Royal Chronicles of Ayutthaya]
1629
The Dutch trade post in Ayutthaya was closed in 1629.
  Reign of King Prasat Thong (1629-1656)
1629
Prasat Thong (r. 1629-1656) sent a diplomatic mission to the Tokugawa Shogunate in Japan in 1629. The third shogun Tokugawa Iemitsu rejected this
mission because of Prasat Thong's usurpation of the throne and the reported conflicts with the Japanese community in Siam. The shogunate never gave
recognition to Prasat Thong's trials in establishing new diplomatic relations. Japan changed it foreign policy under Tokugawa Iemitsu. It started a period
of international isolation through a number of edicts from 1633 onwards, what culminated after the Shimabara Rebellion of 1637 in progressively tighter
restrictions, monopolizing foreign policy, and expelling traders, missionaries, and foreigners.

[Reference: Southeast Asian History Seminar: Ayudhya and the Japanese – Nithi Iawsriwong (1999)]
1630/1
End 1630, begin 1631 Okya Sena Phimuk (Yamada Nagamasa) was murdered. King Prasat Thong succeeded by acts of murder and exile, in eliminating
the Japanese. In the early months of 1633, no Japanese remained in Siam.

[Ref: Royal Chronicles of Ayutthaya; Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
1632
Birth of Prince Narai, the son of King Prasat Thong.

[
Reference: Michael Smithies, Michael (1993) - Abbé de Choisy - Journal of a Voyage to Siam 1685-1686]
1633
In 1633 Gouvernor-General Henrick Brouwer ordered the re-opening of the Dutch "factorij" in Ayutthaya. Justus Schouten returning from Firando
(Japan) was designated to demand the authorization of the Siamese King. Schouten became the first "opperhoofd" until April 1636. Large profits were
seen in the export of deer hides and skins to Japan.

[Reference: Een brief aan Jan Pietersz. Coen teruggevonden - W. Coolhaas - Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde 112 (1956), no: 4, Leiden,
403-415]
1634
3 Feb
Dutch Embassy (Joost Schouten) to the Court of Siam. The VOC were to pay a sum equivalent to 5000 Florins for the right to trade. Schouten gained
very favourable terms for this trade and also purchased a quantity of goods for export to Japan an China. On 3 February he was received in audience by
the king. He obtained from the Phra Klang a promise giving an export monopoly of all East Indian goods to the Dutch and permission to select a site in
Ayutthaya on which to build a factory. In return the Siamese asked the Dutch a naval squadron to assist the next expedition against Patani, which rebelled.

[Ref: Villiers, John (1986) - François Caron and Joost Schouten - A True Description of the Mighty Kingdoms of Japan and Siam - facsimile of the 1671
London edition - The Siam Society, Bangkok.]
1634
Mid-1634 Joost Schouten was back in Siam with six ships in order to keep his promise to help the Siamese to put down the rebellion in Patani.
Unfortunately, by the time the Dutch fleet reached Patani, Prasat Thong, who had assembled a huge army of 40,000 men and a fleet of fifty vessels, had  
been ignominiously driven out as a result of a Portuguese force coming  from Malacca to the aid of the queen of Patani.

[Ref: Villiers, John (1986) - François Caron and Joost Schouten - A True Description of the Mighty Kingdoms of Japan and Siam - facsimile of the 1671
London edition - The Siam Society, Bangkok.]
1635
In 1635, the Siamese intended to launch another attack on Patani and again sought Dutch assistance. The rice harvest that year was so bad that the army
had to be disbanded in order that the troops might plant a new crop.

[Ref: Villiers, John (1986) - François Caron and Joost Schouten - A True Description of the Mighty Kingdoms of Japan and Siam - facsimile of the 1671
London edition - The Siam Society, Bangkok.]
1635
May
King Prasat Thong sends an embassy headed by Okkhun Sri Phakdi to Japan in an attempt to restore the old friendly relations. The Japanese refused to
receive the mission. On its return the ship called at a port in Formosa and while anchored in the Mattauw River (Tainan) on 11 January 1637 was struck
by a typhoon and wrecked.

[Ref: Royal Chronicles of Ayutthaya; Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
1636
The fourth Khlong Lat (short cut) on the Chao Phraya River was dug in 1636. A dozen kilometers downriver, Khlong Lat Muang Nonthaburi was cut
across the neck of Maenam Om by King Prasat Thong. It spared 17 kilometers from the 22-Km journey.

[Reference: The Chao Phya, River in Transition - Steve Van Beeck (1995) - page 39.]
1636
17 Sep
Joost Schouten was sent in August 1636 as a special envoy of the governor-general to King Prasat Thong. Schouten arrived at the mouth of the
Chaophraya River with two heavy East Indiamen, the Leyden and Het Wapen van Delft, each carrying full complements of about 150-200 soldiers and
sailors. He was granted a royal audience (17 Sep) and presented to the Siamese king a letter from the Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic, Frederick Henry,
the Prince of Nassau,  a letter in which the Prince sought to confirm and strengthen the good  relations between the Netherlands and Siam. Next to the
gifts from the governor-general and the prince of Orange, among them a “gold  imperial crown garnished with emeraldo and richly gilt, together with  an
imperial sword, damascened and inlaid with gold" there was also a letter from the newly appointed Governor-General of the Indies, Anthonio van Diemen.

[Ref: Villiers, John (1986) - François Caron and Joost Schouten - A True Description of the Mighty Kingdoms of Japan and Siam - facsimile of the 1671
London edition - The Siam Society, Bangkok; Van Der Kraan, Alfons - Introduction of the Diary of the picnic incident 1636-7 ]
1636
10 Dec
Dutch Picnic incident at Ayutthaya.

[Ref: The Siamese memoirs of Count Claude de Forbin 1685-1688 - Michael Smithies (1996)]
1640/1
All Westerners were expelled from Japan in 1641 and Christianity forbidden; many Japanese converts settled in Siam.

[Ref: Forbin, Claude (de), Count - The Siamese Memoirs of Count Claude de Forbin 1685–1688. Introduced and edited by Michael Smithies. Chiang Mai:
Silkworm Books, 1996]
1643/4
Siamese embassy to Japan. The embassy was refused admission to Japan owing the promulgation of an Edict closing Japan. Friendly relations with Japan
were not restored till 25 September 1887.

[Ref: Giles, Francis H. - Analysis Of Van Vliet's Account of Siam - Part 7 - JSS 30 3b]
   
1600 - 1649